Unraveling The Negative Outcomes Of Social Exchange Theory: Illegitimate Tasking, Self-Handicapping And Organizational Obstruction In Pakistan

Authors

  • Dr. Hina Fayyaz
  • Dr. Nida Abbass
  • Dr. Sehrish Munaf
  • Dr. Sana Iqbal

Abstract

This research paper aims to explore the relationship between illegitimate tasks, self-handicapping, perceived organizational obstruction, and subordinate moqi in a power-distant context such as Pakistan. Data was collected from 333 managerial employees from the public sector of Pakistan and regression analysis was used to test proposed hypotheses. The findings revealed a significant positive relationship between illegitimate tasking and self-handicapping with perceived organization obstruction mediating it. Additionally, attention to the supervisor's implicit cues had a significant effect on perceptions about organizational obstructions derived from Social Exchange Theory experiences at work by subordinates involved therein. This study provides empirical evidence that can help stakeholders globally understand relationships among variables impacted by cultural differences found across diverse contexts studied here.

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Published

2024-03-14

How to Cite

Fayyaz, D. H. ., Abbass, D. N. ., Munaf, D. S. ., & Iqbal, D. S. (2024). Unraveling The Negative Outcomes Of Social Exchange Theory: Illegitimate Tasking, Self-Handicapping And Organizational Obstruction In Pakistan. Migration Letters, 21(S8), 504–516. Retrieved from https://migrationletters.com/index.php/ml/article/view/9336

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Articles