Measuring the Factors Affecting Educators’ Self Efficacy in Counteracting Child Abuse in the United Arab Emirates

Authors

  • Eiman Rashed Omair Mohammed Alshamsi Alshamsi
  • Azlinda Azman Azman
  • Masarah Mohamad Yusof Yusof

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.59670/ml.v21i1.5167

Abstract

Child abuse prevails, demanding strong consideration from parents, caregivers, and other responsible individuals. Children and teenagers spend significant time in educational institutions, providing educators with extensive access to them, particularly in the United Arab Emirates. This research also focused on educators' self efficacy, presumed to be affected by Child Abuse Awareness Training, Work Experience, Personal Attitude, and Gender (as a mediator). The data was gathered using structured survey questionnaires designed under Albert Bandura's self efficacy theory. Results showed that most of the respondents agreed that Child Abuse Awareness Training (p<0.000), Work Experience (p<0.000), Personal Attitude (p<0.000), and Gender (p<0.000) significantly affect their self efficacy. Simply put, educators consider specified training, experience, attitude and Gender as primary factors affecting and strengthening the self efficacy to identify, report, and counteract child abuse in the country. Thus, with the growing concern about child abuse in the United Arab Emirates, this research highlights the importance of educators' confidence in their ability to be aware of child abuse. This emphasis stems from teachers' crucial role in identifying and reporting potential child abuse cases. As a result, supporting the broader objective of ensuring the safety and welfare of children. Finally, the research implications and limitations are discussed.

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Published

2023-10-25

How to Cite

Eiman Rashed Omair Mohammed Alshamsi Alshamsi, Azlinda Azman Azman, & Masarah Mohamad Yusof Yusof. (2023). Measuring the Factors Affecting Educators’ Self Efficacy in Counteracting Child Abuse in the United Arab Emirates. Migration Letters, 21(1), 107 1 25. https://doi.org/10.59670/ml.v21i1.5167

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Articles